Another Cop Kneeling on Someone’s Neck

It seems he really was that stupid. Or that arrogant. Miami Gardens police officer arrested after video shows him with knee on woman’s neck.

That he is facing any repercussions is somewhat amazing. I guess that’s a part of the times. It’s clear he didn’t expect to have to answer for his actions.

The arrest of Safiya Satchell might have gone down as another anonymous case — were it not for the bystander video that showed a Miami Gardens police officer reach into her SUV, drag her out, press his knee on her neck and stun her twice with a Taser.

There was video, which indicates that his arrest report contained a “slew of false statements.” All charges against the woman have been dismissed. He has been charged with battery and official misconduct for the false statements. Felony Stupidity is not a crime in Florida, though he is certainly guilty of that, at least.

Cops are slow learners, apparently. 20 years (or more) gone by and they STILL haven’t figured out that they are on video. So be it. This guy will be hung out to dry, and frankly, he deserves to be. No one this boneheaded should be carrying loaded weapons around in the name of “Law Enforcement.”

Here’s a friendly tip to all LEOs everywhere. If you want to keep your pension, and your job, and avoid a few years in solitary confinement, don’t kneel on necks. You are on video. Repeat after me… You. Are. On. Video.

7 thoughts on “Another Cop Kneeling on Someone’s Neck

  1. Here’s a friendly tip to all LEOs everywhere. If you want to keep your pension, and your job, and avoid a few years in solitary confinement, don’t kneel on necks.

    In fact, just drive around and ignore dispatch….

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    • There is a long way between “don’t be an asshole” and “ignore dispatch.” But you feel good about whatever you feel good about.

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      • And he wasn’t “dispatched.” If you read the article – I know a stretch goal – you would find that he was

        1. Off duty
        2. Working security for the bar in question

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      • If you read the article linked above – a stretch goal, I know – you would find that he was

        1. Off duty
        2. Working security at the bar in question

        Must be nice to have your own facts.

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  3. Either the caption on the video was wrong, or the actual incident happened a year and a half ago, in January 2019. The officer was only recently arrested because the phone video taken by the passenger was just recently (after Floyd) turned over.

    Hm…wonder why that would be? If this conduct was so egregious, why wasn’t the phone video turned over 18 months ago? Why wasn’t the officer arrested then?

    This is political. Someone had video of another cop with their knee on a detainee’s neck and said “hey, I bet I can use this, now that the whole nation’s talking about it”.

    With that aside, someone explain to me what he should have done? He was attempting to execute a legitimate arrest (and yes, even if it’s just to issue a warning, technically, it’s an arrest), the suspect resisted and refused to comply with instructions.

    Should he have just let her go?

    If not, how much force was appropriate?

    Is it just the knee to the neck that’s the problem or were other aspects of the attempt to subdue her a problem as well? Why?

    I’m just curious as to what people who are so willing to throw every cop that uses force under the bus thinks they should do?

    If I were a cop right now, if I didn’t just quit outright, there’s no way I’d use force for anything other than defending my life (I used to say also defending the life of another, but even that’s problematic these days). If a suspect resists arrest, let them go. I’m not going to jail over an arrest. “Sir, would you please place your hands behind your back so I can place you in handcuffs? No? Very well, have a nice day.” Later, to the victim: “Sorry, the person who robbed you didn’t want to be arrested.”

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    • 1. There is a difference between “using force” and kneeling on someone’s neck. Is that an actual technique taught anywhere. The same school as the rough-ride in the back of a van which ended with a guy dead from a broken neck maybe.

      2. I have been throwing bad cops under the bus for a long time. See Cops Behaving Badly. Cops have a tough job, that doesn’t mean they get a pass on corruption/brutality/whatever. It probably colors my world view that I’m from Chicago, and Chicago PD has quite a history.

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