“We can’t allow ourselves to go on auto-pilot when innocent people’s lives are at stake.”

David Yamane always seems to have some insight. Recent events indicate that cops could use some of the insight. It’s Not About the Shoothouse, It’s About Decision-Making with a Gun/

The line that forms the title to this post is about the fact that everyone in his class shot a picture of an under-cover police officer. It brought to mind the shooting in suburban Chicago, where a cop shot an armed security guard, and the shooting in Aurora, Colorado, where cops shot an armed homeowner in his own home. (The homeowner was hard of hearing, and couldn’t hear the cops. The only thing he pointed at them was a flashlight.) There are other examples of course.

Although clearing a structure with a rifle and a partner in search of a hostage in a terrorist bomb making facility is an unlikely scenario for me, I was easily able to substitute my own more realistic (even if also unlikely) scenarios as I reflected on my runs through the shoothouse. For example, I come home from a trip and find the door of my house kicked in and my wife inside, or I am awoken in the middle of the night by a cry of distress coming from my child’s room. Do I sit outside or barricade myself in my room and wait for the police to arrive? No.

I think it’s worth a few minutes of your time.

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Unintentional/Accidental Discharges of a Firearm

Kathy Jackson of The Cornered Cat, is still working on her Unintentional Discharges Project She is up to part 3, in which she answer the question, “Shouldn’t we just keep these under wraps?”

Part 2 is in someways more interesting to me. How you might violate the rules of safety and be lucky. Or why do we have rules of safety?

The gun that you expect to be empty might really be empty.

The unexpectedly-fired bullet might be stopped by a solid 2×4 stud in the wall instead of passing through sheetrock and empty space to hit the child sleeping on the other side.

The noise in the brush that the excited hunter shoots at might actually be a deer instead of another hunter.

Luck happens.

***
Luck happens.
But we never, ever count on luck.
***

Anyway, you might find it interesting, or you might have a story for her collection.

Raleigh Residents Arm Themselves to Fight Crime

Does this count as an example of the militia? Raleigh residents turning to guns to deter crime

A Memphis community is considering turning to guns in order to take back their neighborhood against crime.

The Raleigh area held a meeting last week, and one neighborhood association wants to make sure residents are knowledgeable about gun safety and carry permits.

The media of course has to include a quote from someone who thinks only cops should be armed. But otherwise it is a pretty even-handed article.