Neighbors Were Shocked

Because they always are. Homeowner shoots through front door at would-be intruders.

A resident told police at about one Thursday afternoon, he heard two men singing Christmas carols as they knocked on the door, then tried to kick it in.

The homeowner shot at the men, who took off — one possibly in an older model teal car.

As for the neighbors?

“Kinda scary considering there was a gunshot about 200 yards, if that, from where I’m standing,” Lance Turner says.

Neighbors like Turner in the Lincoln Village neighborhood on the city’s north side off Cook Road are concerned.

The didn’t realize that they lived in The Real World™ where crime can, and all too often, does happen. Oh, and people defend themselves. I’m sure Mr. Turner would have been happy if his neighbor had been injured or killed, as long as no firearms were involved. Or something.

Deputy Brian Ishmael

End of Watch. Neighbors Shocked By Gunfire That Killed Deputy Brian Ishmael.

An El Dorado County deputy was shot and killed while investigating a theft at a marijuana garden in rural El Dorado County early Wednesday morning.

And neighbors were shocked, but then they always are.

Neighbors Were Shocked

But then they usually are. Investigators: Man shot, killed in Whitehall Township after answering front door.

Guy answers his front door at about 5:30 AM. Gets killed. Police are investigating. (More details at the link.)

The neighbors? They didn’t think that they lived in The Real World™ where crime can, and all too often does, happen.

Neighbor Shannon Gallagher awoke to police tape and cop cars outside her window.

“I was scared, still scared, I’m going to talk to the cop right now. We don’t know anything and it’s scary.

Which I grant you, isn’t really being shocked.

“Something like that I would not expect. I’ve been living here seven years now, never seen anything like this. Never had any issues with the neighborhood,” [neighbor Afif Salloum] said.

I am sorry to tell you, but if you are reading this, you don’t live in Pleasantville, and Andy Talyor isn’t the sheriff of your little community. You too live in The Real World™. Crime is not something that happens to “other kinds of people” in “other kinds of places.” There may be statistically more or less crime in you zip code, but the possibility exists. You should plan accordingly.

You Are Not Protected By Your Zip Code

A fairly typical case of self-defense, and a fairly typical case of neighbors being shocked. Woman confronts intruder inside Eastern Shore home.

Baldwin County Sheriff’s Office Captain Cliff Cadenhead said, “The current homeowner was actually in the bathtub and she had two young juvenile children who were in the house also, and the kids heard some movement or whatever going on in the house, would go out there and look and see someone in the house that shouldn’t be in the house.”

Sheriff’s officials say the children told their mother and she told them to get out of the house

But they didn’t get out of the house, and their mother did get a firearm. There was a brief struggle, and the intruder was shot.

And the neighbors were shocked to discover that they live in The Real World™ and not some fantasy land.

Another neighbor, … said, “It’s surprising. It’s a really nice neighborhood. I haven’t met these people specifically, but I met a lot of people in the neighborhood and its always been a calm neighborhood.”

If you can read this, I am sorry to tell you that you too live in The Real World™ where crime can, and too often does, happen. Your neighborhood is not “too nice for crime.” Crime is not something that happens to “other kinds of people” in “other kinds of places.” You are not immune. You should plan accordingly.

He Suffered a Failure of the Victim-selection Process

Even in Deep-blue Philadelphia, self-defense works. And the neighbors are shocked. Philadelphia store employee shoots, kills armed robbery suspect, police say.

The man was trying to rob the store when the lone employee inside – who has a permit to carry a firearm – fired at the would-be robber multiple times, striking him.

He was pronounced dead at the scene. And the neighbors?

Debra Earle, who lives nearby, said she was rattled by what happened at the store.

“Very upsetting, very upsetting,” she told FOX29. “You can’t feel safe walking down the street paying your phone bill right down the street from your home.”

She was never safe. But she lived in a bubble where she was able to delude herself into thinking she was safe. And it’s the 21st Century where facts are irrelevant and the only thing that counts is “Feeling safe.” Not actually being safe. She wasn’t safe last week. She isn’t safe today. Do you think she will consider some type of self-defense? A kubaton? Pepper spray? Anything? I doubt it. In a month, she will “feel safe” again. She still won’t be safe.

Neighbors Are Shocked

Shocked to discover that their zip code doesn’t protect them from crime. Police say attempted burglary leaves one man shot to death in Spring Park.

One person is dead, and another detained. Cops won’t say if it is a homeowner or intruder who was shot. So, on to the neighbors.

“There’s crime everywhere, but I didn’t expect it around the block,” neighbor Melanie Blackburn said. “It’s concerning. That shouldn’t happen in the neighborhood.”

If you can read this, then you live in The Real World™ and not Mayberry RFD or Pleasantville. And in the Real World crime can, and sometimes does happen. Unless you live in a gated community, with guards, where you live doesn’t ensure no crime. Statistics are all about averages, not absolutes.

The Media Is Not Giving Us the Whole Story. Again

It’s almost like they are biased against gun owners. Texas homeowner shoots man he caught sleeping in front yard, deputies say.

They are going on and on about the guy being asleep. He had been asleep. Past tense. Then the attack started.

The man had allegedly been sleeping in the yard, and the homeowner woke him up. That’s when he confronted the man and got into a physical fight with him on the lawn.

When the man lunged at him, the homeowner opened fire, hitting him in the arm and abdomen.

Neighbors are shocked to discover that they live in The Real World™ and in Texas. Before he was shot, he was banging on doors and banging on cars in the neighborhood.

Neighbor Melissa Elrod said the commotion of the banging on her garage door woke up her daughter around 4:30 a.m. Moments later, she heard shots.

“It’s scary, it’s scary. My daughter is five feet from that,” Elrod said.

Self-defense is a human-right.

First He Got Shot, Then He Got Arrested

I’m guessing his day didn’t go the way he planned. Suspect shot then arrested following burglary call in Sherwood. And neighbors were shocked.

He apparently knew someone in the house.

The incident happened on Tuesday night at a home on Community Cove, according to an arrest report.

“The suspect was gone when we got there,” Sgt. Drew Edwards says.

Edwards says Calloway left the scene shortly after getting shot and took himself to a nearby hospital.

Cops arrested him at the hospital. The neighbors?

The crime has some neighbors shaken up, despite living in a place that they otherwise describe as safe.

“We’ve got police cars that come down through here two or three times a day,” Vicki LaSpina says, who lives just a few blocks away from where it happened.

Because they didn’t realize they were living in The Real World™ where crime can and sometimes does happen. Oh, and self-defense is a human-right.

Self-defense in Memphis

Oh, and neighbors are shocked scared. East Memphis woman shoots burglar after he kicks down her door.

He was looking for somebody. He found somebody, but not who he was looking for.

Police say William Barnes was shot after he kicked in the front door of a home on South Holmes Street. Four days later the shooting still has one neighbor traumatized

The guy who got shot – several times – ended up at a local hospital, where he was arrested and charged with aggravated burglary.

The neighbor? She shocked and dismayed to discover that she lives in The Real World™ and some fantasy land.

“I don’t know what I’m going to do right now. I mean, it’s so disturbing that this happened.”

After a week she says that. (I am woman, hear me cry hysterically.)

Neighbors Are Terrified

By the realization that they live in a place where crime, and police action, can take place. Spokane Valley neighbors call Saturday’s fatal shooting ‘unsettling’.

Reports of a guy who was apparently high, and bothering kids. Cops get there and he runs for a homeless camp, then stops and pretty much tells the cops he has a weapon, so they shoot him.

The homeless camp? No big deal. The guy who was high, hanging around kids? Apparently that is not a problem. The cops on the other hand…

“It’s terrifying. And that’s our backyard,” said neighbor Crystal Runions. “What if my youngest had said, ‘hey, can I go out with my friends and play with my Nerf guns?’ and they were just running around and one of those bullets went stray and took our one of our kids?”

What do you expect from Washington State?

But if you can read this, then you live in The Real World™ where crime can, and sometimes does, happen, and that usually results in some kind of action by the police. Up to and including shooting the bad guys.

They Took The Money, Then Shot a 79-year-old Woman in the Back

We are constantly told by the gun-hating Left to just give the Bad Guys what they want, and they will leave us alone. These guys didn’t get that memo. Hunt for 79-year-old store owner’s killers continues.

“For someone to come in, do a robbery, take the money, just like they asked, and then shoot them in the back, there you go. At this point, we even have criminals out looking for them,” said Detective Ed Troyer, with the Pierce County Sheriff’s Department.

Violent criminals do not stop being violent criminals because of anything you are doing, or not doing.

And neighbors were shocked to discover that they live and work in The Real World™ and not in some fantasy land.

“To come in here and blemish our neighborhood and feel our safety is threatened is really hard to believe,” Larry Chambers said.

Because they want to feel safe, even if they aren’t safe.

Neighbors Are Shocked

And self-defense works, even in Eastern Pennsylvania (deep blue as it is.) Person taken to hospital after shooting in New Hanover Township.

Police said this shooting was “domestic related.” Initial reports said an intruder had been shot by a homeowner.

Both can be true at the same time. Reporters seem confused on that score. As for the neighbors…

Neighbors said they’re shocked something like this would happen on their quiet street.

Sorry, but if you can read this you live in The Real World™ where crime can, and often does, happen. You are not protected by your zip-code. Crime doesn’t only happen to “other kinds of people” in other kinds of places.” You should plan accordingly.

Whether You Feel Safe, Or Not, Doesn’t Impact If You Are Safe, Or Not

I know the 21st Century is all about feelings, but some reality needs to creep in now and again. Campus Edge landlord increasing security following death of tenant.

I know this is another Neighbors Were Shocked story, which makes 3 in 2 days. I think it is a sign of the times.

A shooting occurred. One person died. Another was rushed to the local hospital. Residents of this “off-campus” apartment complex are disturbed that their studies could be interrupted by the Real World™.

“Do you feel safe living there?” Asked 7New Reporter Stefany Bornman.

“After 2 days? Not so much, but before that, I would say yeah,” Rossen told 7News.

So what was different 3 days ago? She was ignorant of the fact that she lives in The Real World™ where crime can, and sometimes does happen. She thought – because she is a college student – that she was guaranteed a crime-free existence. And actually that apartment complex is not a crime-free oasis.

According to the Spartanburg County Sheriff’s Office since 2007, there’s been 465 incident reports filed by different Campus Edge tenants for a slew of offenses.

Even if most of those are on the level of littering, or “he’s being mean,” or “Make him stop looking at me,” (which is the kind of thing I expect from college students today) some of them are probably for serious offenses.

But if you can read this posting, even if you are sitting in the middle of a college campus, you are in that Real World, and you should plan accordingly.

It Was Off-campus Student Housing. Bet There Was a Gun-ban

Oh, and neighbors/students are shocked. “It was scary,” Nerves rattled for residents at Langston University apartment complex after double shooting.

Langston University police and the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation are investigating a double shooting that sent two people to the hospital with multiple gunshot wounds.

It happened around 1 a.m. Thursday at an apartment complex owned by Langston University just off the campus.

Police think there were 4 suspects. 2 people had to be flown to a trauma center with multiple gunshot wounds. This riled up the campus because they didn’t know they live in The Real World™.

“I can’t believe this. I’m totally in shock,” Letina Mcleod, who also lives at the complex, said.

There is more of that.

The Austin Bomber: One Year Later

Austin was convinced they were an oasis. They were always part of The Real World™ they just didn’t know it at the time. ‘I still want to know why’ | One year later, how the Austin bomber was stopped.

This is a fairly long read, but it covers everything. Austin Police Chief Brian Manley, Homicide Detective Rolando Ramirez, the involvement of the ATF, the decent in force of the FBI. Blind alleys the investigation went down. The random nature of the victims. The clues that finally identified the suspect. And more. It’s all here, and pretty engaging.

And of course the shock that Austin suffered when the people of that city discovered that they were not immune to bad things happening.

“I was angry because he made us go through all of this, the community, he took the peace away from Austin,” Det. Ramirez said. “It was senseless.”

Chief Manley hoped that Austin could “feel safe” again. And maybe they can, but they were never safe, no matter how they felt about it. They weren’t safe 2 years ago, and they aren’t safe today. No one is; that is just a part of being human, though we don’t like to think about it much.

Neighbors Were Shocked – By a Swatting Call

At least no one was shot by police. SFPD investigating possible ‘swatting’ incident involving tech leader.

A “Facebook cybersecurity executive” was targeted.

“The male caller stated that he had just shot his wife in their home, he had the kids tied up, there were pipe bombs everywhere, and if police responded that he would harm the police if they came to help,” said Janine De La Vega, Public Affairs Manager Palo Alto Police Department.

Not a prank, as the death last year proves.

Neighbors?

Neighbors were surprised to learn of the incident.

“Horrible, definitely. I’ve been living here for six years it’s always been really, really quiet. So I’m surprised to hear that for sure,” said Manuela Zavattaro, neighbor.

Swatting is a crime. And if you can read this, then you live in The Real World™ where crime can and all to often, does happen.

It’s Bad Enough When “Neighbors Are Shocked”

When police are shocked – because they too are living in dreamland – you’re in a bad situation. State College shootings: 5 shot in rampage near Penn State campus. (State College is the name of the town.)

“Quite frankly it’s shocking and disturbing. We like to think of this place as Happy Valley. We like to think these things can’t happen here. But one of the things that it makes you realize is that it can happen here and does happen here,” said State College Police Chief John Gardner.

What are the chances that he has a plan, or has tested a plan, for how to deal with an active shooter, for a guy who attacks a grade-school, say. If the police are this clueless, what are the chances that the school districts have any plans about lockdown, or shelter-in-place? My guess – exactly zero.

If you can read this, then you do not live in Pleasantville or Mayberry; you live in The Real World™ where crime can, and all to often does, happen. You should plan accordingly. And if you are police chief, you should plan, drill, encourage the schools/others to plan, etc. Get your head out of the sand. (Or wherever you have your head buried.)

“Hope is not a strategy.”

This is the strategy that is inherently followed by all the “shocked neighbors” whenever they find out that crime can happen in their town. LOCK THE DOORS!. If you won’t listen to me – and evidence is that you won’t – maybe Massad Ayoob can convince you.

“It won’t happen to me because I live in a nice place” is not a strong defense. That thinking comes under “hope is not a strategy.” Criminals with functional IQs realize the nicest homes have the nicest stuff to steal. And criminals realize that in the sparsely populated hinterlands, there are fewer witnesses and the thin blue line of police is stretched particularly thin.

Some good advice about what to do, and what to tell ALL the members of your household, especially the trusting ones. (Bad guys don’t exist in my neighborhood!)

Why Do They Want to “Feel safe” as Opposed to Actually “Being Safe?”

Or at least be working to improve their level of safety. (The world is not a safe place, and you can’t make it one by wishing or doing.) After Jayme Closs returns, northwest Wisconsin wonders how to feel safe again.

The randomness of a meticulously planned crime has shaken residents of Barron, Wis.

Double murder of the parents. Kidnapping of the girl. Escape, followed by arrest of the bad guy. The story has been all over the news.

But one thing caught my attention. Or actually, it made me want to scream.

People are uncertain. They’re frightened,” said local newspaper editor Bob Zientara, who has the ear of a town that, in an instant last week, became overwhelmed with joy at Jayme’s return. “It’s tempered joy because now [people] realize that things like this can happen here.”

Really?!! They believed that bad things couldn’t happen in their neighborhood/town/county/state? Really? Crime only takes place in “Other kinds of places.” Crime only impacts “Other kinds of people.” That is one crazy attitude.

The article goes on to say that the only alternative to the head-in-the-sand denial of reality, is to “live in fear.” That comes up several times. I don’t agree. You can acknowledge the reality of where you live – it isn’t Mayberry or Pleasantville. You can do some preparation. You can stop living inside your head, and pay attention to your surroundings and take some action. Now a gun may not have saved this couple. “There are no guarantees in this life save for death and next winter’s snow.” But a head in the sand attitude wouldn’t help. Opening your front door to any knock without looking, or having some preparation.

I don’t know, maybe the sheep are always in fear, and can only live in their fantasy world of zip-code-induced-safety. If so, it is a pretty poor commentary on the state of society.

Neighbors Were Shocked

Your Zip Code does not protect you. Not a normal day: Public saw work of law enforcement firsthand while officers searched for shooting suspect that may not have existed.

There was a shooting on the Mississippi University for Women (MUW) and the cops spent the afternoon looking for the shooter – but they later issued a statement saying the gunshot may have been self-inflicted.

This is a long article, and the bit that really caught my attention is almost an afterthought.

Another woman, who worked in a separate office near MUW Police Department and who did not want to be named in The Dispatch, spent the lockdown sitting in her own car parked just off campus, texting a co-worker locked in their office.

“I never thought in this little town it would happen right here on our campus,” she told a Dispatch reporter at the scene.

You are not immune from crime because of where you live. Crime can – and does – happen anywhere. Crime is not something that happens in “other kinds of areas” to “other kinds of people.” You can be a victim. You should plan accordingly.