Are the Media Hoping a Hurricane Will Hit the US?

It seems that way to me. There are a large number of folks jumping up and down over the fact that the 5-day forecast storm track for Tropical Storm Erika is pointed at Florida. Tropical Storm Erika: Track takes it a little farther east | www.palmbeachpost.com (See below for a quote from a guy at the Hurricane Center about 5 day forecasts.)

It has been 10 years since a hurricane made landfall on a US coastline. I think it is really pissing the global-warming/climate-change folks off. This isn’t what was forecast. This isn’t what they predicted. They predicted more and more powerful storms. They predicted death and destruction. They got none of it.

The Palm Beach Post is one of the few sources that is noticing the latest change in the forecast. Granted, the official track is aimed directly at Palm Beach County.

Tropical Storm Erika is expected to reach Category 1 hurricane strength early Monday as it approaches Florida, but a mosey to the right in the forecast track late Wednesday may signal a more northerly long-term path.

But enough about the biases of the media.

If you live in Florida, you should be prepared for a hurricane. You should have been prepared in January, even though the season didn’t start then. Water. Food. Meds. Documents. Full gas tank. (You should not be driving around with the gauge on “E.” You don’t save money that way. You don’t drive less.) Shutters. Escape plans. Family plans. Everything ready. If you aren’t prepared – didn’t we just have the 10th anniversary of Katrina? – you are asking for trouble. Didn’t you learn anything from Andrew or Katrina?

Actually even the .gov tells everyone (not just Floridians) to have a MINIMUM of three (3) days worth of food, water and medicine. MINIMUM. Natural or man-made disasters are NOT limited to Florida or California.

Dennis Feltgen, a spokesman for the National Hurricane Center, said it’s important for people not to focus on the center of the forecast cone.

“There is a great deal of uncertainty of what this storm will look like once it gets through the wind shear,” Feltgen said. “You can’t hang your hat on something that is five days out.”

In other words: Don’t wait for the last freaking minute to prepare. You might not have that minute.